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Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance (MP3)
Released the same day as the standard print edition
Title:
Dreams From My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance (MP3)
Written by:
Barack Obama 
Read by:
Barack Obama 
Format:
Unabridged MP3 CD Audio Book 
Number of CDs:
Duration:
14 hours 5 minutes 
MP3 size:
609 MB 
Published:
November 05 2021 
Available Date:
November 05 2021 
Age Category:
Adult 
ISBN:
9781867591726 
Genres:
Non-fiction; American; Memoirs; Political 
Publisher:
Bolinda audio 
Qty
Format
Price
Bolinda price
AUD$ 49.95
AUD$ 49.95
 

New York Times bestselling author

Before Barack Obama became a politician he was, among other things, a writer. Dreams from My Father is his masterpiece: a refreshing, revealing portrait of a young man asking the big questions about identity and belonging.

The son of a black African father and a white American mother, Obama recounts an emotional odyssey. He retraces the migration of his mother’s family from Kansas to Hawaii, then to his childhood home in Indonesia. Finally he travels to Kenya, where he confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.

‘Barack Obama … the Democratic Party’s new rock star, is that rare politician who can actually write – and write movingly and genuinely about himself.’
New York Times

‘A beautiful reflection on an unusual background and a thoughtful analysis of what race means in America today.’
Scotsman

‘A remarkable story, beautifully told.’
Observer

‘Beautifully crafted … moving and candid … this book belongs on the shelf beside works like James McBride’s The Color of Water as a tale of living astride America’s racial categories.’
Scott Turow, bestselling author of The Laws of Our Fathers

‘An honesty and self-awareness not always found in autobiographers, and more rarely in potential leaders of the free world.’
The Telegraph