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Title:
The Riders (MP3)
Written by:
Tim Winton 
Read by:
Greg Saunders 
Format:
Unabridged MP3 CD Audio Book 
Number of CDs:
Duration:
10 hours 54 minutes 
MP3 size:
474 MB 
Published:
August 01 2022 
Available Date:
August 01 2022 
Age Category:
Adult 
ISBN:
9781867598480 
Genres:
Fiction; Australian Fiction; Contemporary Fiction; General Fiction; Literary Fiction 
Publisher:
Bolinda audio 
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Format
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Bolinda price
AUD$ 39.95
AUD$ 39.95
 

International bestseller
Award winning author
Australian author
Western Australian author

Winner The Commonwealth Writer's Prize / Best Book (South East Asia and South Pacific Region) 1995
Shortlisted The Man Booker Prize 1995
Shortlisted Victorian Premier's Literary Awards / Vance Palmer Prize for Fiction 1995
Shortlisted Australian Book of the Year 1994

The Riders, the novel that brought Tim Winton his first Booker Prize shortlisting, charts an odyssey across Europe, a transfixing journey through the underworld of every lover's nightmare.

Fred Scully waits at the arrival gate of an international airport, anxious to see his wife and daughter. After two years in Europe they are finally settling down. He sees a new life before them, a stable outlook again, a fresh start, a cottage in the Irish countryside that he’s renovated by hand. He’s waited, sweated on this reunion. The flight lands. The doors at the airport hiss open. And Scully’s life falls to pieces.

'Winton has forced a different kind of thinking about men and their imperatives, about the value and meaning of action ... The Riders is a grand, poised, metaphorical reconciliation.'
Sydney Morning Herald

'Makes the senses jump. Concentrated, passionate, invigorating.'
The Independent

'The curse of this haunting book is that you read it too fast.'
The New Yorker

'A brilliant reflection on the instability of personality and memory.'
The Daily Telegraph